INVISIBLE CITY. The Architecture of Devotion in Seventeenth-Century Neapolitan Convents - Helen Hills

INVISIBLE CITY. The Architecture of Devotion in Seventeenth-Century Neapolitan Convents - Helen HillsAutore: Helen Hills
Titolo: Invisible city
Sottotitolo: The Architecture of Devotion in Seventeenth-Century Neapolitan Convents
Descrizione: Volume rilegato in formato 8° (cm 24 x 16,5); 268 pagine+ 38 n.n. contenenti le illustrazioni; 10 tavole  a colori e 44 in b/n; peso: Kg 0,600
Luogo, Editore, data:  Oxford University Press Inc, 2004
Collana: 
ISBN: 0195117743  EAN: 9780195117745
Prezzo: Euro 95,00
Prezzo: Euro 80,00
Disponibilità: 1 esemplare

 


richiedi informazioni


Invisible City vividly portrays the religious world of seventeenth-century Naples, a city of familial and internecine rivalries, of religious devotion and intense urban politics, of towering structures built to house the virgin daughters of the aristocracy. Helen Hills demonstrates how the architecture of the convents and the nuns' bodies they housed existed both in parallel and in opposition to one another. She discusses these women as subjects of enclosure, as religious women, and as art patrons, but also as powerful agents whose influence extended beyond the convent walls.

More than any other European city, Baroque Naples was dominated by convents. Behind their imposing facades and highly decorated churches, the convents of Naples housed the daughters of the city's most exclusive families, women who, despite their cloistered existence, were formidable players in the city's power structure. Invisible City vividly portrays the religious world of seventeenth-century Naples, a city of familial and internecine rivalries, of religious devotion and intense urban politics, of towering structures built to house the virgin daughters of the aristocracy. Helen Hills demonstrates how the architecture of the convents and the nuns' bodies they housed existed both in parallel and in opposition to one another. She discusses these women as subjects of enclosure, as religious women, and as art patrons, but also as powerful agents whose influence extended beyond the convent walls. Though often ensconced in convents owing to their families' economic circumstances, many of these young women were able to extend their influence as a result of the role convents played both in urban life and in art patronage. The convents were rich and powerful organizations, riven with feuds and prey to the ambitions of viceregal and elite groups, which their thick walls could not exclude. Even today, Neapolitan convents figure prominently in the city's fabric. In analyzing the architecture of these august institutions, Helen Hills skillfully reads conventual architecture as a metaphor for the body of the aristocratic virgin nun, mapping out the dialectic between flesh and stone.

Condividi questo articolo

Submit to FacebookSubmit to TwitterSubmit to LinkedIn
Questo sito raccoglie dati statistici anonimi sulla navigazione, mediante cookie installati da terze parti autorizzate, rispettando la privacy dei tuoi dati personali e secondo le norme previste dalla legge.
Continuando a navigare su questo sito, cliccando sui link al suo interno o semplicemente scrollando la pagina verso il basso, accetti il servizio e gli stessi cookie.